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THE MORISSETTE FAMILY LINKS


THE CHICAGO MORISSETTES - HISTORY OF BRIGHTON PARK


HISTORY OF EARLY CHICAGO MODERN CHICAGO AND ITS SETTLEMENT EARLY CHICAGO, AND THE NORTHWEST
BY ALBERT D. HAGER
page 797


The village of Brighton Park lies in the triangle south of the Illinois & Michigan Canal, which through the influence of John McCafiery was not annexed to the city of Chicago in 1869, when the rest of the two-mile strip from the east part of the town of Cicero was thus annexed. This triangle is two miles long on its southern boundary, Thirty-ninth Street, and contains six hundred and six acres The original town of Brighton was bounded on the north by Thirty-fifth Street; on the east by Western Avenue; south by Wright Street, and on the west by Blanchard Avenue. This was laid out in 1840.

Previous to this, however, the east half of the southwest quarter of Section 36 was laid out. This eighty acres was taken up as Government land by Henry Seymour, father of Hon. Horatio Seymour of New York, in 1835, who held" receipt No. 2,326, dated June 26, 1835, for $232, in full payment for the east half of the southwest quarter of Section 36, Township 39, Range 13."

The patent was issued October 1, 1839, and recorded February 14, 1857. This part of the section when platted was divided first into four equal portions by three lines running east and west at equal distances from each other. Tim-north twenty acres were then divided into three blocks, numbered 1, 2, 3, commencing at the east, owned respectively at the time of the subdivision by Josephine F. Paul,' Elmira A. Smith and Sarah A. Thompson.

The second fourth of this tract was not subdivided, was numbered Block 4, and was owned by Usher Parsons. It lies immediately north of the Chicago & Alton Railroad. Block 5, lying immediately south of this railroad, contained twenty acres, and was owned by Alfred S. Huntington, and the south fourth of this half of the quarter section was divided similarly to the north fourth into three equal blocks, numbered respectively 6, 7 and 8, commencing at the west. Block 6 was owned by Stephen B. Estin, Block 7 by Cornelius Estin, and Block 8 by Harvey F. Payton. The petition for the partition of this eighty acres was filed March 22, 1866.

Usher Parsons sold to William R. Smith his block of this subdivision September 17, 1868, but Mr. Smith died before his deed could be obtained, but not before giving Adam Smith power of attorney to sell his interest. Under this power of attorney Adam Smith sold William R. Smith's interest to Pierson D. Smith. Pierson D. Smith's subdivision was acknowledged April 22, 1871. It was bounded on the north by Boardman Avenue, on the east by Kiukade Street (now California Avenue), on the south by Wright Street, and on the west by Adam Smith's subdivision. The present village of Brighton Park is, however, now mainly on the southeast quarter of Section 36, instead of on the southwest quarter.

John McCaffery is called the father of the place. John Mc-Caffery, General Richard K. Swift, John Evans, William S. Johnson, a Mr. McCollister, of Philadelphia, and Nicholas Egglehart, were the incorporators of the place .in 1851. This company built the Blue Island plank.road and bought nearly all the land adjoining for ten or twelve miles south, built the Brighton House, and subdivided the' southeast quarter of the section.

Some time afterward Mr. McCaffery bought out the interests of all the other members of the company, except those of Mr. Egglehart--who held on in an undefinable man-ner-and thus the company became dead. The town then commenced to grow. John McCaffery and others began to build, N. Croworth and a Mr. Kelly built a fine house, as did also the DuPont Powder Company of Delaware. S. N. Wilson built a house. Adam Smith in September, 1871, had a re-survey made of his subdivision, at which time the section lines were established, and Adam Smith's lots put on the market by Joseph Donnersberger, his agent.

Quite a number of lots were sold and houses built thereon. Thus the village of Brighton was fairly begun, the name of the town being derived from an old race-course inside the city limits and south of Archer Avenue. In building his house in 1871, Mr. Donnersberger made an excellent improvement. In the fall of 1871 the Brighton Cotton Mill was finished, and in 1873 the Brighton Silver Smelting and Refining Works began operations under the management of Adam Smith, who employed from seventy to one hundred and thirty men, all living in Brighton, and at that time with their families composing most of the inhabitants of the town.

The village kept improving all the time. J.C. Thayer and John Leggate finished their houses in the spring of 1872, and Mrs. Honkomp her's in the fall. Jacob Singer, of Chicago, built a large distillery by the canal, but never ran it himself. It was leased to a Mr. Cochran from Ohio, and by him ran about eighteen months, when the whole property was confiscated by the Government, since which time the distillery has remained closed.

The post-office was started in 1873, and at first called Factoryville, but as there was already another post-office in the State by that name, the name of this post-office was changed to Brighton Park. The first and only Postmaster was and is Mathew Larney. The first store was started by John McCaffery at the corner of Archer and Western avenues. He ran it himself for some years, when he rented it to the Larney Bros., who now continue to run it as a store and a saloon. The next store was started in 1874 by Lars Peterson. Shortly afterward he moved it from its ,location on Smith Street near Pierson to the corner of McCaffery Avenue and Pierson streets. Here he kept it three years when he sold it to a Mr. Buckley, who moved it to Halsted Street. This was a grocery.

At the present time there are seven groceries in the village and five saloons. The first dry goods store was started here in 1883 by Mr. McCormick, and a second in the same year by John Noonan. In 1875 the Chicago & Alton Railroad Company established their round-house and repair shops at this place, the round-house having twenty-two stalls.

The Brighton Cotton Mill was commenced in 1871 and completed in 1872. The company engaged in the enterprise was composed of Adam Smith, Frank Cosset, Ray & Coates, and John McCaffery. The main building is a five-story brick, 150x60 feet in size, a dye and dry house, 60x40 feet, and an engine house 40x40, are attached to the main building, as are 'also four warehouses. The entire cost of the buildings was about $200,000.

In 1876 the original company sold out to Ray & Coates, who in about one year sold out, and it fell into the hands of Mr. McCaffery. Mr, McCaffery took into company with him John J. Mitchell, Jr, William H. Mitchell, W. S. Parker and John A. Hinner, who now constitute the Brighton Cotton Mill Company and conduct the business. John McCaffery is president of the company and John J. Mitchell, Jr., secretary and treasurer. As managed by this company the business is a splendid success.

The various products of the mill are all kinds of carpet yarns, twines for weaving, saddlers' threads, etc. The value of the annual product of the mill is about $200,000.

The Northwestern Horse Wail Company was organized in May, 1864. The first directors were A. W. Kingsland, George L. Smalley, Charles J. Wyeth, N. Corwith and J. R. Jones. A.W. Kingsland commenced the business of making horse nails in 1862. At that time he had only five machines in operation. In 1864 the present company was organized, the capital increased and the business enlarged. The new works at Brighton Park were soon afterward erected. The main building covers an area 254x350 feet. The engine room is 40x 80 feet, and contains two Corliss engines, aggregating 550 horse power. The boiler house is 50x60 feet, and contains six boilers. In the factory there are one hundred of Dodge's forging machines, and seventy-five finishing machines, and every other appliance necessary to the prosecution of the manufacture of horse nails is in their works.

These works have a capacity of six tons of nails per day, equivalent to one million and eighty thousand nails. About five acres of ground are inclosed in the center of the town. About two hundred hands are employed, the semi-monthly pay roll amounting to $5,000. The plant was originally located on West Van Buren Street, but the business developed so rapidly that the large structure at Brighton Park was soon a necessity. The present officers of this company are J. R. Jones, president; A. W. Kingsland, secretary and treasurer, and J. D. Kingsland, superintendent.

Religious.--The first Church organization effected in Brighton Park was a Union Church composed about equally of Methodists and Baptists, in 1871. This organization was continued until May 5, 1878, when the Baptists effected an organization of their own. During the time of the union a frame church edifice was erected, fifty-eight by thirty-eight feet in size, at a cost of $5,000. This building the society bad to sell in order to pay off its debts.

In 1879 the Church was re-organized in the school-house by the Revs. Dr. Willing and Rev. George Boswell. They continued to use the school-house until the completion of their new church edifice in 1882. It stands at the corner of Thirty-eighth and Green streets, will seat three hundred people, and cost about $2,000. The Rev. Mr. Boswell was succeeded by Rev. Mr. Longdon, Rev. Mr. McMil-lan, Rev. Mr. Thompson, Rev. Mr. Davidson, and the present pastor, Rev. George Hazzard. The membership of the Church is now about forty, and is in a flourishing condition, having been self-supporting since October, 1883.

page 798 Brighton Park Baptist Church was started May 5, 1848, with eleven members, by Rev. Henry Happell, who was the first pastor, a student at Morgan Park. Rev. Mr. Happell preached for the Church until the latter part of 1881. The Church met at first for about six months in the old Methodist church building, then for about a year in the house of William Boxley, when they built the small frame building they now occupy, in the winter of 1879-80.

It stands at the corner of Thirty-eighth Street and Blanchard Avenue, and cost about $700. At present this Church has no regular pastor, but depends on supplies from Morgan Park. In . January, 1882, it disbanded and turned over its property to the American Baptist Society. It is now merely a mission with a congregation of about fifty. Rev. W. H. Stone is the present supply.

St. Agnes' Roman Catholic Church was established in 1878, by Father Egan, who remained from December 8 of that year to September 18, 1881. He was then succeeded by the present pastor, Father Michael J. Horgan. When established this Church had a membership of about one hundred families, and at present has about three hundred families, or about fifteen hundred members, counting the children.

The society owns ten lots worth about $500 per lot, upon which it has just erected a two-story brick building, fifty-three by one hundred and seven feet in size, at a cost of $21,000, for a parochial school. The school' is under the charge of the Sisters of Mercy, the superioress being Sister Euphrasia. This school opened on Monday February 4, 1884, With one hundred and thirty-eight scholars, and on the last day of the week it had one hundred and eighty-three scholars. The society intends to erect a church edifice as soon as practicable. The present value of its property is about $26,000.

Schools.--Brighton Park is in the remnant of School District No. 5--that part of it not taken into the city of Chicago in 1869. A school-house was built in 1866, a small frame structure. In 1877 the central part of the present school-house was erected, a two-story frame with four rooms, and in 1881 an L was added with two rooms. In this latter year the school was graded.

The principal teachers of this school since 1868 have been Miss Fox from 1868 to 1870; Mr. Fellows, from 1870 to 1872; J.B. McGinty, from 1872 to 1879; Miss Anna M. Wilson, from 1879 to 1881, and Anthony Lenon from 1881 to the present time. Mr. Lenon's assistants are now Miss Anna M. Willson and Miss Sullivan.

BRIGHTON BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

DANIEL ACKERMAN, grower and shipper of cabbage and manufacturer of saner kraut, was born in Switzerland in 1843, and immigrated to Chicago in 1847 with his parents. In the spring of 1862 he came to Brighton, and has been largely engaged in growing and shipping cabbage, cultivating some sixty acres of land. He also in 1880 established a large saner kraut factory, and in connection with these pursuits he also, since December, 1880, carried on a large coal business. He is an active, enterprising business man, is a: director of district school, having been elected to that office in 1882.

HISTORY OF EARLY CHICAGO MODERN CHICAGO AND ITS SETTLEMENT EARLY CHICAGO, AND THE NORTHWEST BY ALBERT D. HAGER page 798

JOSEPH DONNERSBERGER, real estate agent, office 162 Washington Street, Chicago, was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1843, and was after reaching maturity engaged in that city in the real estate business for some years. In 1870 he came West and located at Chicago, where he at once established himself in the the real estate business, In 1871 he located, his place of resideuce at Brighton, where he has since resided. Mr. Donners-berger was elected Collector of the town of Cicero in 1873, and Assessor of the town in 1874. In 1876 he was elected a member of the Board of Trustees of Cicero for a term of four years, and re. elected in 1880, and during his membership in that body he filled the position of President of the board. In the fall of 1881, he was elected a Commissioner of Cook County from the Fourth Commissioner's District, and December 3, 1883, was elected President of the Board of County Commissioners, an office which he is now filling.

HISTORY OF EARLY CHICAGO MODERN CHICAGO AND ITS SETTLEMENT EARLY CHICAGO, AND THE NORTHWEST BY ALBERT D. HAGER page 798

ADAMES HUTCHINSON, foreman at the shops of the Northwestern Horse Nail Company, was born at Streetsville, Ontario, August 16, 1845. His parents left there when he was quite young, and resided for a time in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and finally in Genesee County, N.Y., where he was raised on a farm. Early in 1861 he enlisted in Company K, 21st New York Volunteer Infantry, was taken prisoner at Snickerville, Va., in August, 1862, and was incarcerated for thirty days in Libby Prison. He served until mustered out in the fall of 1863, after which he returned home to the farm. He came to Chicago in 1865 and was employed in various capacities until 1868, when he entered the employ of the N. W. Horse Nail Co. to learn the machinist trade. Mr. Hutchinson has remained in the employ of this company ever since, and has by energy and industry raised himself to the position of foreman, a position he has filled since 1878.

HISTORY OF EARLY CHICAGO MODERN CHICAGO AND ITS SETTLEMENT EARLY CHICAGO, AND THE NORTHWEST BY ALBERT D. HAGER page 798

PATRICK 11. JOYCE, Deputy Sheriff of Cook County, is a native of western Ireland, and when three years of age his parents immigrated to America. His father, Dominick Joyce, settled in Chicago in 1847. The subject of this sketch after reaching maturity was variously employed. In 1867, he opened a hotel and boarding stable near the locks of the canal, and carried it on for eight years. Subsequently he embarked in business for a time in Chicago, then in town of Lake, up to December, 1882. In January, 1883, he was appointed to his present position. Previous to this Mr. Joyce had served under Sheriff Charles Kern. He has resided at Brighton since 1881, and is a charter member of A. O. H., No. 27, of that place, and at present holds the office of president of that society.

HISTORY OF EARLY CHICAGO MODERN CHICAGO AND ITS SETTLEMENT EARLY CHICAGO, AND THE NORTHWEST BY ALBERT D. HAGER page 798

THOMAS KELLY, contractor, is a native of Providence. R. I., born in 1843, and while he was young his parents moved to Washington County, Wis., where he was reared on a farm. In December, 1860, he came to Chicago and was employed for several years in various capacities. In 1864 he moved to Brighton and engaged in grocery business, in 1876 selling out his interest in that business and engaging for some three years as superintendent of the Brighton Cotton Mill. Since 1879 he has been following his present business, contracting for the building of sewers, water works, etc. In connection with other pursuits he was, also, associated with Dolese Shepard, contractors for street improvements, from 1869 to 1876. Mr. Kelly was for eleven years a member of the school board of Brighton, and in 1881 was elected a member of the Board of Trustees of Cicero, in which capacity he is still serving.

HISTORY OF EARLY CHICAGO MODERN CHICAGO AND ITS SETTLEMENT EARLY CHICAGO, AND THE NORTHWEST BY ALBERT D. HAGER page 798

LARNEY BROTHERS, coal merchants, grocers, etc. This firm is composed of John and Matthew Larney. They are natives of Cavan County, Ireland, and came to Illinois in 1872, locating at Brighton. John was then eighteen and Matthew fourteen years of age. They were both employed in the grocery business of Thomas Kelly & Co., and Matthew was also for fifteen months employed in the Illinois Trust & Savings Bank of Chicago. In 1878 these young men purchased the business of Kelly & Co., and by close application and industry have built up a large trade. They carry a fine stock of groceries, crockery, flour, etc., and their coal business gives employment to several teams. Matthew Larney was appointed Postmaster at this place in 1874, a position which he still holds.

HISTORY OF EARLY CHICAGO MODERN CHICAGO AND ITS SETTLEMENT EARLY CHICAGO, AND THE NORTHWEST BY ALBERT D. HAGER page 798

JAMES I LARNEY, Justice of the Peace, was born in Cavan County, Ireland, December 25, 1853, and there he was engaged in produce and egg business. He immigrated to Illinois in 1872, locating at Brighton, Cook County. He worked at various things up to 1874, when he became employed as a special policeman and detective with John Emmett, which position he filled for nine months; also worked some years as special policeman and night watchman for the Brighton Cotton Mills. In 1879 he engaged in business as a dealer in wines, liquors, etc. He was elected Justice of the Peace in the spring of 1883, and is a member of A. O. H., No. 27, and the Independent Order of Foresters.

HISTORY OF EARLY CHICAGO MODERN CHICAGO AND ITS SETTLEMENT EARLY CHICAGO, AND THE NORTHWEST BY ALBERT D. HAGER page 799

JOHN LEGGATE, machinist. Northwestern Horse Nail Company, was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, in 1841 and came with his people to America in 1848. In 1856 they moved to Livingston County, Ill., where John was employed on his father's farm. In 1859 he moved to Chicago and learned the trade of engineer and machinist. He enlisted in August, 1862, in Company D, 89th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded four times, and after being mustered out in June, 1865, was incapacitated for a year for active work. He then followed his trade in Chicago. In 1868 he moved to Brighton, and put up the machinery for the Brighton Feed Mill, acting as engineer of the same for three years, when it was changed to the Brighton Silver Smelting Works, and Mr. Leggate was appointed night superintendent, a position he filled for four years. In 1875 he was appointed engineer at the Brighton Cotton Mills, remaining there until 1880, he entered the employ of the Northwest Horse-Nail Company. He put up all the machinery, and also put in the boilers, etc., in the company's shops at this place, Mr. Leg-gate is a member of the A. F. & A. M. He was elected Justice of the Peace at this place in 1877, and still fills that office. [p.799]

HISTORY OF EARLY CHICAGO MODERN CHICAGO AND ITS SETTLEMENT EARLY CHICAGO, AND THE NORTHWEST BY ALBERT D. HAGER page 799

JOHN NOONAN, dealer in dry goods etc., was born in Brighton, Cook Co., Ill., July 4, 1854. At the age of fourteen years he began business life as a teamster in the employ of his father, and subst quently he carried on the business of teaming, etc., up to 1878. He was elected County Constable from this locality in the spring of 1875, and re-elected in 1881. He established his dry goods business at this place in August, 1883. He carries a nice stock, and is building up a good business.

HISTORY OF EARLY CHICAGO MODERN CHICAGO AND ITS SETTLEMENT EARLY CHICAGO, AND THE NORTHWEST BY ALBERT D. HAGER page 799

THOMAS RANKIN, foreman of the carpenter department Fowler Bros. Packing House, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1835, where he learned the trade of carpenter. In 1852 he immigrated to Montreal, and in 1854 came to Chicago. For two years he worked at his trade, then engaged in business as a contractor and builder. In 1858 he went south to Memphis, Tenn., where he carried on business as a builder. Returning to Chicago in 1863, he engaged in his former business. Five years later he entered the employ of the C., A. & St. L. R. R. Co. as foreman of car repairing department, which position he resigned in June, 1881, to accept his present one with Fowler Bros. Mr. Rankin has resided at Brighton since the spring of 1878. In 1882 he was appointed a member of the Board of Trustees of Cicero to fill an unexpired term of five months. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M.

HISTORY OF EARLY CHICAGO MODERN CHICAGO AND ITS SETTLEMENT EARLY CHICAGO, AND THE NORTHWEST BY ALBERT D. HAGER page 799

JOHN B. SEGERS, contractor and builder, was born in Belgium May 19, 1929. Here he learned the trade of carpenter, serving as an apprentice some five years, and carried on for some years business as a contractor and builder. He also followed his trade in Paris. France, for several years. In 1865 he immigrated to Peoria. Ill, where he worked at his trade until the fall of 1871, when he changed his base of operations to Chicago, and in 1874 came to Brighton, where he has since carried on a large business as a builder. For some years he has been in partnership with John Skerry They employ some ten men, and besides building the Catholic church at this place, they have erected a large number of private residences. Mr. Segers is the oldest contractor in this place.

HISTORY OF EARLY CHICAGO MODERN CHICAGO AND ITS SETTLEMENT EARLY CHICAGO, AND THE NORTHWEST BY ALBERT D. HAGER page 799

HARRY A. WILLS, master mechanic of the Northwestern Horse Nail Company, was born at Tanbridge, Essex Co., Vt., in 1814, and fourteen years later his parents moved to Essex County, N. Y. In 1830 he went to Keesville, N. Y., and learned the trade of machinist. About 1830 he entered the employ of E. and J. D. Kingsland in their rolling mill and nail factory. In 1871 in connection with J. D. Kingsland he invented a machine for the finishing of horse nails. The machines are now used by the Northwestern Horse Nail Company, and Mr. Wills came West to Chicago in 1872, the enter the employ of that company as master mechanic at the factory. The shops being moved to Brighton, Mr. Wills located here in May, 1881. His machine is a fine invention and yields him a handsome royalty.
DESIGNED BY LYN

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